Monday, April 6, 2009

ARTISTS IN EXILE: How Refugees from Twentieth-Century War and Revolution Transformed the American Performing Arts

I can't imagine American cinema without many of my favorite movies—Sunset Boulevard, Double Indemnity, The Apartment, and Some Like It Hot. What do they have in common? Billy Wilder—a refugee from Hitler's Europe.

Now in paperback, Joseph Horowitz's Artists in Exile: How Refugees from Twentieth-Century War and Revolution Transformed the American Performing Arts is a history of the “intellectual migration” that relocated thousands of artists and thinkers to the United States, including some of Europe’s supreme performing artists, and makers of film, theater, and ballet. For many of Europe's premier performing artists, America proved to be a destination both strange and opportune.

Featuring the stories of George Balanchine, Kurt Weill, Fritz Lang, Billy Wilder, Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Igor Stravinsky, and many others, Artists in Exile explores the impact that these famous newcomers had on American culture, and that America had on them.

"A masterful study of how the Russian Revolution, the rise of European Fascism, and the Second World War all transformed the American performing arts."—The Economist

"Heroically researched . . . chock-full of fascinating vignettes, stunning quotations, and shrewd insights on the fly."—New York Times

If you're considering Artists in Exile for one of your courses, please order an
examination copy.

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